Narrative Medicine

Reading, Writing, and Reflecting in Clinical Practice, Teaching, and Self-Care

This program will introduce the theory and practice of Narrative Medicine through a variety of practical activities and discussion. Participants will be guided through in-class exercises in close reading, close listening, and creative and reflective writing. Sessions will include an ongoing discussion on the ways that healthcare practice can be informed by narrative medicine and the relationship between the creative and healing arts, as well as the ethical questions raised by narratively-informed approaches.

More advanced elements of the art of writing will be introduced as the course proceeds.

This new program consists of seven 2.5-hour sessions and will require in-between-session homework and reading.

There is an associated registration fee of $700. A maximum of 17 participants will be accepted into the program on a first come-first serve basis. Registration closes September 9, 2019.

March 2020
Narrative Medicine: Reading, Writing, and Reflecting in Clinical Practice, Teaching, and Self-Care (Spring 2020)
  • Thu, Mar 12 to
    Thu, May 28
Narrative Medicine: Reading, Writing, and Reflecting in Clinical Practice, Teaching, and Self-Care (Spring 2020)

PROGRAM OVERVIEW

Narrative medicine, both in medical practice and education, is practiced with a focus on the skills of communication and collaboration which are essential to positive health outcomes. Learning how to write and reflect more expertly gives practitioners a powerful skill with which to build therapeutic and collegial relationships, improve patient outcomes, and live and work in a more reflective and engaged way. This program is designed for healthcare practitioners looking to inform their professional practice with narrative approaches to health and medicine, and those seeking to explore creative and reflective writing for their own sake.

This program will introduce the theory and practice of Narrative Medicine through a variety of practical activities and discussion. Participants will be guided through in-class exercises in close reading, close listening, and creative and reflective writing. Sessions will include an ongoing discussion on the ways that healthcare practice can be informed by narrative medicine and the relationship between the creative and healing arts, as well as the ethical questions raised by narratively-informed approaches.

More advanced elements of the art of writing will be introduced as the course proceeds. Participants will read a selection of short literary works and discuss what they offer as models, and the course will offer opportunities for participants to share their own work, enhancing their comfort with expression, communication, and feedback. Guest speakers will offer theoretical, practical and creative perspectives on additional genres, such as poetry and non-fiction.

This new program consists of seven 2.5-hour sessions and will require in-between-session homework and reading.

Registration is now open. There is an associated registration fee of $700. A maximum of 17 participants will be accepted into the program on a first come-first serve basis. The program will run if a minimum of 10 participants is met.

TARGET AUDIENCE

Healthcare clinicians and educators with no experience or limited experience in:

  • narrative medicine
  • reflective writing
  • creative writing

LEAD FACILITATOR

Damian Tarnopolsky has taught courses in Narrative Medicine at the Centre for Faculty Development for several years, and led writing and reflection workshops for medical students and residents as the Barbara Moon Fellow at Massey College from 2016-19. He is the author of two books: the novel Goya’s Dog, a finalist for the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize and the Amazon.ca First Novel Award, and the short fiction collection Lanzmann and Other Stories, which was nominated for the ReLit Award. His play The Defence won the 2019 Voaden Prize. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Toronto and has taught writing and literature at the School of Continuing Studies, where he was recently nominated for an Excellence in Teaching award, and Humber College. A frequent contributor of essays and reviews to Canadian publications, he is also the proprietor of Slingsby and Dixon, an editorial services company in Toronto.

SCHEDULE & LOCATION - GENERAL INFORMATION

Each session will be held in at the Li Ka Shing International Healthcare Education Centre of St. Michael’s Hospital located at 209 Victoria Street, Toronto.
Please arrive for 5:50pm, as the main doors of 209 Victoria Street lock at 6pm.

*Most sessions are bi-weekly, but the third session (Apr 2) is only 1 week after the second session (Mar 26). We have done our best to avoid holidays and apologize for any conflicts as we could not circumvent them all.

Please see below for detailed list of dates, times, and room locations.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This is not a formally accredited program but it is a group learning activity as defined by the Maintenance of Certification Programs of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and of the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

QUESTIONS?

Please contact Farah Friesen,
Research & Program Coordinator, CFD
Farah.Friesen@unityhealth.to

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